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Mount Carleton Provincial Park, New Brunswick, Canada

Mount Carleton Provincial Park, New Brunswick, Canada

By on May 17, 2017



We explore Mt. Carleton Provincial Park’s waterfalls, lakes, and trails, in Northern New Brunswick, Canada

We made the best of yesterday’s rain and chilly temperatures by doing some work and then enjoying a delicious dinner. We roasted duck thighs and potatoes with herbes de Provence and served them with cabbage and red wine vinegar slaw. It all turned out wonderfully if I do say so myself.

Parked at Armstrong Campground at Mt. Carleton Provincial Park

Parked at Armstrong Campground at Mt. Carleton Provincial Park

When we first got up this morning, the weather looked like more of the same, but as we were drinking our coffee blue sky started to emerge from behind the grey clouds. By the time we were finished our bacon and eggs, we had bright blue skies and fluffy white clouds, so we decided to make the best of the sunshine.

We took a drive deeper into the park. Mt. Carleton is unlike any of the other provincial parks we’ve visited in NB so far. It’s much wilder and less developed and frankly all the better for it. We drove past pristine lakes banked by rolling mountains. We spotted plenty of evidence of wildlife, but the only critters we saw were partridges.

Stopping for a view of Mt. Sagamook, in Mt. Carleton Provincial Park

Stopping for a view of Mt. Sagamook, in Mt. Carleton Provincial Park

Our first stop was at the Williams Falls Trail. We had read in my Waterfalls of New Brunswick guide this little waterfall was worth a visit, especially as the hike is only 0.3kms. The book was correct, and the falls were lovely, especially this early in the spring when the water is gushing. The water in the surrounding ponds looks crystal clear, and we took our time enjoying and photographing the falls.

The stunning Williams Falls at Mt. Carleton Park, New Brunswick

The stunning Williams Falls at Mt. Carleton Park, New Brunswick

There's plenty of water falling from Williams Falls in Mt. Carleton

There’s plenty of water falling from Williams Falls in Mt. Carleton

From Williams Falls, we continued skirting the edge of Big and Little Nictau Lakes and on to Pine Point. This area serves as the trailhead for three hiking trails: Dry Brook, Caribou Brook, and Pine Point. We opted for the shortest of the three, needing to reawaken our long dormant hiking muscles, and set out on the two kilometre Pine Point Trail.

The pristine Bathurst Lake in Mt. Carleton Provincial Park

The pristine Bathurst Lake in Mt. Carleton Provincial Park

A slightly wet spot of a picnic or a lazy fisherman's spot at Bathurst Lake.

A slightly wet spot of a picnic or a lazy fisherman’s spot at Bathurst Lake.

As the name suggests, the Pine Point Trail circles a point of land that juts into the Bathurst Lake. The red pine forest on the point grew here after a fire in 1933. We saw evidence of beavers and what was most likely moose, but no actual wildlife other than birds. The scenery, however, was lovely, particularly at the end of the point. From there we overlooked the lake and Teneriffe Mountain in the distance.

Setting out on the Pine Point trail at Mt. Carelton Provincial Park, NB

Setting out on the Pine Point trail at Mt. Carelton Provincial Park, NB

It's easy to see why this is the Pine Point trail.

It’s easy to see why this is the Pine Point trail.

The view of Mt. Teneriffe from the tip of Pine Point

The view of Mt. Teneriffe from the tip of Pine Point

Mt. Tenerife in Mt. Carleton Provincial Park, NB.

Mt. Tenerife in Mt. Carleton Provincial Park, NB.

As we were wrapping up our hike, the wind began to pick up, and our blue skies started shifting quickly to grey. We had a few spits of rain on the way back to our campsite. We had enough time for a quick email check at Headquarters and to park Yeti before the heavens opened. The campers around us scattered for their trailers as the rain pelted down. Then, just as quickly as it came on, the rain stopped.

We had a snack of cheese and pâté, and I began prepping for supper. Soon, we’ll be grilling shrimp I’ve marinated in lime, chilli, and olive oil served with a pearl couscous, mango, pepper, and green onion salad.

We’ll see what tomorrow holds weather-wise before we make any further plans. As it’s our last full day in the park, I hope we can get out and explore a bit more. Mt. Carleton is certainly the perfect place to get back in touch with the wild vastness of Canada’s nature, and we’re enjoying every minute of it.




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Alison

Writer and Photographer at CheeseWeb.eu
Alison Cornford-Matheson is a freelance writer and travel photographer. In 2005, she landed in Belgium where she founded CheeseWeb.eu a travel resource for slow travel in Europe and beyond. She dreams of the open road and exploring Europe’s hidden secrets in her motorhome, Amelia, with her husband, Andrew, and her spoiled house-cats. She can often be found with a Nikon, a good book and a glass of red wine within reach. You can also follow her on Google+ and @Acornn on Twitter.

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